I’m with the Banned

I am a big fan of Spotify especially here in the Root + Branch office. Sometimes a good jam session is completely necessary to keep your day moving. Spotify recently released a timely project entitled: I’m with the Banned. And I’m encouraging everyone to give it a listen!

Spotify launched the playlist and original series, as a music initiative to empower artists and fans from different cultures to collaborate. By coupling the music of banned nations with American voices, Spotify is “amplifying the voices of people and communities that have been silenced.”

The series focuses on issues that range from immigration to LGBTQ equality through artist collaborations, performance and original content.

 

As Spotify explains, “The artists featured in “I’m with the banned” break stereotypes, bend genres and approach their art with open ears. Artists include:

  • Kasra V – DJ and record producer hailing from Iran and specializing in techno/deep house, he hosts a bi-weekly radio show on NTS Radio and is a curator of the Dance playlist for 22Tracks
  • Moh Flow – Singer/songwriter from Syria who co-produces with his brother, AY. While residing in Dubai and traveling the world, the 25-year-old has had the chance to harness his music making skills to release music consistently over the Internet.
  • Waayaha Cusub – A Somali musical collective that organized the first international music festival in Somalia’s capital since the start of the civil war in the early 90s.
  • Methal – Yemeni singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, who learned to play by watching American YouTube videos.
  • Sufyvn – Acclaimed producer/beatmaker whose electronic tracks blend American hip-hop and traditional Sudanese music.
  • Ahmed Fakroun – Singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from Libya and pioneer of modern Arabic Music, influenced by Europop and French art rock.”

 

Happy Listening!!!

 

-L

Guide to not being Complicit with Gentrification

I know this article says its a guide for “artists” but actually many of the tips are valuable for anyone who is at risk of being a “gentrifier.” Not sure if that applies to you there’s a quick way to think about it: Did you grow up in the neighborhood you’re living in?  If not, now ask yourself: are the people that did grow up here being displaced because of affordability or housing stock? If yes, you are likely living in a gentrifying (or gentrified) neighborhood.

But that doesn’t mean you have to be a part of the problem. In fact, there are ways you can be part of the solution, immediately.

Read on. It’s worth it.

Let me summarize it for you though:

  1. put your privilege to work for others.
  2. Respect the history of your surroundings.
  3. do not assume your perspective or experience is universal or most important.

 

Tell us how you mitigate gentrification in your neighborhood.