Sharing the Benefits of Solar in DC: Georgetown University

We are thrilled to announce the launch of our first project through the Neighborhood Solar Equity initiative. We have partnered with community centered solar developer, Community Renewable Energy to install 1.1 mW on Georgetown’s campus, making it one of the largest on site solar arrays in Washington, D.C.

Through an innovative project model the system will produce renewable energy for the University and amplify the benefits of solar for the District of Columbia.

We created the model to serve the energy needs of the University, while also ensuring the surrounding neighborhoods benefit from the renewable energy. Profits from the system have been dedicated by the partners toward reinvestment in DC neighborhoods, including through a “Community Investment Fund” which, in collaboration with Georgetown University, will support clean energy projects in low-income areas of the District.

The project is expected to generate about 1.5 million kilowatt-hours of power each year, contributing to a cleaner electric grid and offsetting an estimated 25,506 US tons of CO2 in it’s lifetime, which is the equivalent of planting 593,300 trees in D.C. Installed at no cost to the university, the project is expected to save the university over $3 million on energy costs over 20 years.  Furthermore, it’s anticipated to catalyze over $1.5 million more in local community investment.

Read more about our Neighborhood Solar Equity initiative, access the Georgetown University Solar- Press Release 4.22.17, or read more from our friends at Georgetown.

 

 

Georgetown University & Unsung Heroes

The Washington Post did a spotlight on an effort initiated by Georgetown University students to bridge a divide between students and campus staff, through a project called “Unsung Heroes.” In the vein of social media accounts like Humans of New York, Unsung Heroes provides quick spotlights of familiar faces around campus. The only difference? They are all of the workers who keep their universities running behind the scenes. Cashiers, bus drivers, janitors, etc.

Each of those workers has a story. Many of them are immigrants, and their collective histories of war and flight and families left behind offer a master class in geo­politics. No tuition needed.- Petula Dvorak, Washington Post reporter

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